Monthly Archives: May 2015

Lighthouses of South Korea: Northern Gangwon, Gisamun Hang‏

Week 22/52

A lighthouse is a tower, building, or other type of structure designed to emit light from a system of lamps and lenses and used as a navigational aid for maritime pilots at sea or on inland waterways.

Lighthouses mark dangerous coastlines, hazardous shoals, reefs, safe entries to harbors, and can also assist in aerial navigation. Once widely used, the number of operational lighthouses has declined due to the expense of maintenance and replacement by modern electronic navigational systems such as strobes.

F/10, 1/200 sec, ISO – 100, Photoshop CS6

Project #22

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Wise Decision…

Week 21/52

Never cut a tree down in the wintertime. Never make a negative decision in the low time. Never make your most important decisions when you are in your worst moods. Wait. Be patient. The storm will pass. The spring will come. – Robert H. Schuller

F/7.1, 1/50 sec, ISO – 100, Photoshop CS 6

Project #21

River Without Water

Week 20/52

In a new era of conditions dangerously affected by global warming, the world’s waters are rapidly running dry creating crisis for wild habitats and human civilization. impacting the livelihoods of hundreds of millions of people, animals, farming, lives, electricity, and threatening with CO2 and methane release, exacerbating climate change.
World’s major rivers drying – One third are gone or going – Groundwater wells for 3 billion people are drying up
The world’s water resources are rapidly running dry creating a global crisis for every living being on the planet. 1 billion – nearly 1/6th of the world’s population – are already facing water shortages on a daily basis. In short, do not waste water in our daily life.

F/8, 1/100 sec, ISO – 100, Photoshop CS6

Project #20

Cake Decoration

Week 19/52

The term “cake” has a long history. The word itself is of Viking origin, from the Old Norseword “kaka”. Although clear examples of the difference between cake and bread are easy to find, the precise classification has always been elusive. For example, banana bread may be properly considered either a quick bread or a cake. The Greeks invented beer as a leavener, frying fritters in olive oil, and cheesecakes using goat’s milk. In ancient Rome, basic bread dough was sometimes enriched with butter, eggs, and honey, which produced a sweet and cake-like baked good. Latin poet Ovidrefers to the birthday of him and his brother with party and cake in his first book of exile, Tristia. Early cakes in England were also essentially bread: the most obvious differences between a “cake” and “bread” were the round, flat shape of the cakes, and the cooking method, which turned cakes over once while cooking, while bread was left upright throughout the baking process.

Cake decorating originated in 17th century Europe. During the 1840s, the advent of temperature-controlled ovens and the production of baking powder made baking cakes much easier. As temperature control technology improved, an increased emphasis on presentation and ornamentation developed. Cakes began to take on decorative shapes, were adorned with additional icing formed into patterns and flowers, and food coloring was used to accent frosting or layers of cake. Cake decorating was rumored to be started by a French bakery in the 1840s where a French baker wanted to increase the prices of the cakes and hence thought to decorate it. Even though baking from scratch decreased during the latter part of the 20th century in the United States, decorated cakes have remained an important part of celebrations such as weddings, anniversaries, birthdays, showers and other special occasions.

F/5.6, 1/15 sec, ISO – 1600, Photoshop CS6

Project #19

Different Perspective

Week 18/52

Read through some article and found a very good article describing different people might had different perspective of seeing a same thing and it is true… Wish to share with all of you.

“What we do see depends mainly on what we look for. … In the same field the farmer will notice the crop, the geologists the fossils, botanists the flowers, artists the colouring, sportsmen the cover for the game. Though we may all look at the same things, it does not all follow that we should see them.”
― John LubbockThe Beauties of Nature and the Wonders of the World We Live in

F/5.6, 1/25 sec, ISO – 100, Photoshop CS6

Project #18

Bathing the Buddha

One particular ceremony during this Wesak festive time is called: “Bathing the Buddha”. To bathe the Buddha is to pour scented, blessed water over an image of an infant Prince, who has his right forefinger pointed upwards and left forefinger directed downwards. The Prince’s image embodies the enlightened presence of the Buddha. This ritual comes in different forms in each country that it is practiced in, but they are all throwbacks to a single sacred story. It is a story that brings sentient beings together in a joyful celebration of a promise. That promise is nothing less than the end of suffering and ignorance.

According to the ancient stories, the Buddha was born in a very peculiar fashion. Since his mother, Queen Māyā was standing up – or more accurately, leaning against a sara tree – when she gave birth, the baby sprang from her side, landing right on the ground. He was born clean and radiant. The Prince could already walk, and walk the four points of the cardinal directions he did. Wherever he set his feet lotuses sprang up and blossomed. His right forefinger pointed up to the sky and his left down to the grass. Finally, he spoke, although by this time his mother probably had reckoned that she’d seen everything and wasn’t as surprised as she thought she would be:
“Above heaven and below heaven, none are equal to me. This is my last birth. There will be no more rebirths.”
The legend claims he was then showered generously from the skies by the sacred waters of devas (gods) and nāgās, semi-divine serpents. In the Chinese tradition they are sometimes depicted as fully divine dragons.
 

The Wesak Day

Wesak or Vesak, also known as Buddha Purnimaand Buddha Day, is a holiday observed traditionally by Buddhists. Sometimes informally called ” Buddha’s Birthday”, it actually commemorates the birth, enlightenment (nirvana), and death (Parinirvana) of Gautama Buddha in the Theravada or southern tradition. “The birth of the Buddha: Queen Maya holds on to the branch of a tree while giving birth to the Buddha, who is received by god Indra as other gods look on”. On Vesākha Day, Buddhists all over the world commemorate events of significance to Buddhists of all traditions: The birth, enlightenment and the passing away of Gautama Buddha. As Buddhism spread from India it was assimilated into many foreign cultures, and consequently Vesākha is celebrated in many different ways all over the world. In India, Vaishakh Purnima day is also known as Buddha Jayanti day and has been traditionally accepted as Buddha’s birth day. On Vesākha day, devout Buddhists and followers alike are expected and requested to assemble in their various temples before dawn for the ceremonial, and honorable, hoisting of the Buddhist flag and the singing of hymns in praise of the holy triple gem: The Buddha, The Dharma (his teachings), and The Sangha (his disciples). Devotees may bring simple offerings of flowers, candles and joss-sticks to lay at the feet of their teacher. These symbolic offerings are to remind followers that just as the beautiful flowers would wither away after a short while and the candles and joss-sticks would soon burn out, so too is life subject to decay and destruction. Devotees are enjoined to make a special effort to refrain from killing of any kind. They are encouraged to partake of vegetarian food for the day. In some countries, notably Sri Lanka, two days are set aside for the celebration of Vesākha and all liquor shops and slaughter houses are closed by government decree during the two days. Also birds, insects and animals are released by the thousands in what is known as a ‘symbolic act of liberation’; of giving freedom to those who are in captivity, imprisoned, or tortured against their will. Some devout Buddhists will wear a simple white dress and spend the whole day in temples with renewed determination to observe the eight Precepts. Celebrating Vesākha also means making special efforts to bring happiness to the unfortunate like the aged, the handicapped and the sick. To this day, Buddhists will distribute gifts in cash and kind to various charitable homes throughout the country. Vesākha is also a time for great joy and happiness, expressed not by pandering to one’s appetites but by concentrating on useful activities such as decorating and illuminating temples, painting and creating exquisite scenes from the life of the Buddha for public dissemination. Devout Buddhists also vie with one another to provide refreshments and vegetarian food to followers who visit the temple to pay homage to the Enlightened one.

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