Monthly Archives: June 2015

Kingscliff – New South Wales

Week 27/52

Kingscliffs first name was Sutherland Point. It got this name when early settlers found a grave on the hill with the name Sutherland on it. Rich red fertile soil of Cudgen and the abundant sea-life on the coast of Kingscliff attracted the Tweed aboriginal clan of the Coodjingburra to settle in this area. They spoke the Bundjalung tongue and settled upon the coastal strip running from the Brunswick River to the Tweed River and then approximately fifteen kilometers inland to the now present site of Murwillumbah. The headland at Kingscliff was an important meeting place for this clan, with numerous middens near the beach proving testimony to the fine fishing and many corroborees.

Kingscliff is a coastal town just south of Tweed Heads in the Northern Rivers region of New South Wales, Australia, and is part of Tweed Shire. Kingscliff is a beach community offering a variety of holiday accommodations. Together with the villages of Chinderah and Fingal, it is a tourist destination that provides beach and estuary access for swimming, surfing, fishing and water sports. An ocean way allows pedestrians and cyclists to move from the historic centre of town out to the emerging new communities along the Tweed Coast in a sustainable manner. The main Kingscliff beach has in the past suffered from severe erosion, with portions of the Caravan Park and beachside carparks being threatened or reclaimed by the sea. The Kingscliff view from the plane was beautiful with the blue green ocean.

F/5.6, 1/400 sec, ISO – 100, Photoshop CS6

Project #27

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Tweed Heads – New South Wales

Week 26/52

Tweed Heads is a town located on the Tweed River in north-eastern New South Wales, Australia, in Tweed Shire. Tweed Heads is located next to the border with Queensland, adjacent to the “Twin Town” of Coolangatta, a suburb of the Gold Coast. It is often referred to as a town where you can change time zones – even celebrate New Year twice within an hour – simply by crossing the street, due to its proximity to the Queensland border, and the fact that New South Wales observes daylight saving whereas Queensland does not.

In 1823 John Oxley was the first European to see the Tweed Valley, and he wrote of it: “A deep rich valley clothed with magnificent trees, the beautiful uniformity of which was only interrupted by the turns and windings of the river, which here and there appeared like small lakes. The background was Mt. Warning. The view was altogether beautiful beyond description. The scenery here exceeded anything I have previously seen in Australia.” Timber cutters originally moved to the Tweed Valley in 1844. After the timber had been cleared, farmers moved in with bananas, cane and dairy farming dominating the area, while a fishing industry developed.

F/5, 1/400 sec, ISO – 100, Photoshop CS6

Project #26

Spotted Eagle Ray – Aetobatus narinari

Week 25/52

The spotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari) is a cartilaginous fish of the eagle ray family, Myliobatidae. It can be found globally in tropical regions, including the Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii, off the coast of West Africa, the Indian Ocean, Oceania, and on both coasts of the Americas at depths down to about 80 meters (262 ft). The rays are most commonly seen alone, but occasionally swim in groups. Rays are ovoviviparous, the female retaining the eggs then releasing the young as miniature versions of the parent.

This ray can be identified by its dark dorsal surface covered in white spots or rings. Near the base of the ray’s relatively long tail, just behind the pelvic fins, are several venomous, barbed stingers. Spotted eagle rays commonly feed on small fish and crustaceans, and will sometimes dig with their snouts to look for food buried in the sand of the sea bed. These rays are commonly observed leaping out of the water, and on at least two occasions have been reported as having jumped into boats, in one incident resulting in the death of a woman in the Florida Keys. The spotted eagle ray is hunted by a wide variety of sharks. The rays are considered Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List. They are fished mainly in Southeast Asia and Africa, the most common market being in commercial trade and aquariums. They are protected in the Great Barrier Reef.

F/5.6, 1/60 sec, ISO – 100, Photoshop CS6

Project #25

Don’t Keep Starring at Me…

Week 24/52

The water monitor (Varanus salvator) is a large lizard native to South and Southeast Asia. Water monitors are one of the most common monitor lizards found throughout Asia, and range from Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and India to Indochina, the Malay Peninsula, and various islands of Indonesia, living in areas close to water. Breeding maturity is attained for males when they are a relatively modest 40 cm (16 in) long and weigh 1 kg (2.2 lb), and for females at 50 cm (20 in). However, they grow much larger throughout life, with males being larger than females. Adults rarely exceed 1.5–2 m (4.9–6.6 ft) in length, but the largest specimen on record, from Sri Lanka, measured 3.21 m (10.5 ft). A common mature weight of V. salvator can be 19.5 kg (43 lb). However, 80 males killed for the leather trade in Sumatra averaged only 3.42 kg (7.5 lb) and 56.6 cm (22.3 in) snout-to-vent and 142 cm (56 in) in total length; 42 females averaged only 3.52 kg (7.8 lb) and 59 cm (23 in) snout-to-vent and 149.6 cm (58.9 in) in total length, although unskinned outsized specimens weighed 16 to 20 kg (35 to 44 lb). Another study from the same area by the same authors similarly estimated mean body mass for mature specimens at 20 kg (44 lb) while yet another study found a series of adults to weigh 7.6 kg (17 lb). The maximum weight of the species is over 50 kg (110 lb). In exceptional cases, the species has been reported to attain 75 to 90 kg (165 to 198 lb), though most such reports are unverified and may be unreliable. They are the world’s second-heaviest lizard, after the Komodo dragon. Their bodies are muscular, with long, powerful, laterally compressed tails.

F/5.6, 1/250 sec, ISO – 800, Photoshop CS6

Project #24

Duck Discussion

Week 23/52

Duck 1: Hey guy… can you see the man standing there? What is he doing with a black box on his hand?

Duck 2: That black box is call camera.

Duck 3: Then why he pointing at us? I feel uncomfortable…

Duck 4: He is trying to photoshoot us.

Duck 5: What??? Are you say “SHOOT”…?

Duck 3: Oh god, I don’t want to die… I still young and single.

Duck 1: I don’t want be shoot to die, I rather be roasted and served on table…

Duck 2:  Guy… photoshoot won’t kill you. In other word mean capturing the great and beautiful moment of life.

Duck 5: Are you mean that the man are capturing the great and beautiful moment of us?

Duck 4: Yes indeed, so just give your best pose for him to shoot.

Duck 2:  Yes and who know you might become the superstar and get a lot of “LIKE” once he posted on the website.

Duck 1:  Oh really… hey guy, do you think I need to put on more lipstick… err… how about my eyeliner? Are they look pretty?

Duck 2: “Speechless”…

Duck 4: “Faint”…

F/5.6, 1/80 sec, ISO – 200, Photoshop CS6

Project #23

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