What to Clip…

iPhoneOgraphy – 19 Feb 2016 (Day 50/366)

A binder clip, or a banker’s clip or foldover clip, is a simple device for binding sheets of paper together. It leaves the paper intact and can be removed quickly and easily, unlike the staple. The term bulldog clip is used in the United Kingdom to describe both this invention and an older device with the same function, which is stronger and has rigid rather than folding handles. It is also sometimes referred to as a “handbag clip” because, when not in use, its clip can be up to look like a handbag.

The binder clip was invented in 1910 by Washington, D.C. resident Louis E. Baltzley, who ultimately was granted U.S. Patent number 1,139,627 for his invention in 1915. At that time, the method of binding sheets of paper together was to punch holes in them and sew them together, making it tedious to remove a single sheet of paper.

Louis Baltzley invented the binder clip to help his father, Edwin Baltzley, a writer and inventor, hold his manuscripts together easily. While the original design has since been changed five times, the basic mechanism has remained the same.

Baltzley initially produced his invention through the L.E.B. Manufacturing Company. These earliest binder clips are stamped “L.E.B.” on one side of the sheet steel. Manufacturing rights were later licensed to other companies.

Shot & Edited using iPhone 6+  

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About The Inspiration Shots

My name is Tommy Too and I'm a newbie in photography and blogging. The intention of creating this blog is to share some of my work and to keep track the improvement of my photography skill. Nevertheless the most important thing is to getting feedback or comment from other professional photographer just like you.

Posted on February 19, 2016, in iPhoneOgraphy 366, Photography and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Ian Burgess Photography

    I had no idea an I-phone could be that macro….nice work!

    Liked by 1 person

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