Lead Pen Story

iPhoneOgraphy – 19 Mar 2016 (Day 79/366)

Prior to 1565 (some sources say as early as 1500), a large deposit of graphite was discovered on the approach to Grey Knotts from the hamlet of Seathwaite in Borrowdale parish, Cumbria, England. This particular deposit of graphite was extremely pure and solid, and it could easily be sawn into sticks. This remains the only large – scale deposit of graphite ever found in this solid form. Chemistry was in its infancy and the substance was thought to be a form of lead. Consequently, it was called plumbago (Latin for “lead ore”). Many people have the misconception that the graphite in the pencil is lead, and the black core of pencils is still referred to as lead even though it never contained the element lead. The words for pencil in German (Bleistift), Irish (Peann Luaidhe), Arabic (qalam raṣāṣ), and other languages literally mean lead pen.

The value of graphite was soon realised to be enormous, mainly because it could be used to line the moulds for cannonballs, and the mines were taken over by the Crown and guarded. When sufficient stores of graphite had been accumulated, the mines were flooded to prevent theft until more was required. Graphite had to be smuggled out for use in pencils. Because graphite is soft, it requires some form of encasement. Graphite sticks were initially wrapped in string or sheepskin for stability. The news of the usefulness of these early pencils spread far and wide, attracting the attention of artists all over the known world.

England continued to enjoy a monopoly on the production of pencils until a method of reconstituting the graphite powder was found. The distinctively square English pencils continued to be made with sticks cut from natural graphite into the 1860s. The town of Keswick, near the original findings of block graphite, still manufactures pencils, the factory also being the location of the Cumberland pencil museum.

The first attempt to manufacture graphite sticks from powdered graphite was in Nuremberg, Germany, in 1662. It used a mixture of graphite, sulphur, and antimony.

Residual graphite from a pencil stick is not poisonous, and graphite is harmless if consumed.

Around 1560, an Italian couple named Simonio and Lyndiana Bernacotti made what are likely the first blueprints for the modern, wood-encased carpentry pencil. Their version was a flat, oval, more compact type of pencil. Their concept involved the hollowing out of a stick of juniper wood. Shortly thereafter, a superior technique was discovered: two wooden halves were carved, a graphite stick inserted, and the halves then glued together – essentially the same method in use to this day.

English and German pencils were not available to the French during the Napoleonic Wars; France, under naval blockade imposed by Great Britain, was unable to import the pure graphite sticks from the British Grey Knotts mines – the only known source in the world. France was also unable to import the inferior German graphite pencil substitute. It took the efforts of an officer in Napoleon’s army to change this. In 1795, Nicolas-Jacques Conté discovered a method of mixing powdered graphite with clay and forming the mixture into rods that were then fired in a kiln. By varying the ratio of graphite to clay, the hardness of the graphite rod could also be varied. This method of manufacture, which had been earlier discovered by the Austrian Joseph Hardtmuth, the founder of the Koh-I-Noor in 1790, remains in use. In 1802, the production of graphite leads from graphite and clay was patented by the Koh-I-Noor company in Vienna.

In England, pencils continued to be made from whole sawn graphite. Henry Bessemer’s first successful invention (1838) was a method of compressing graphite powder into solid graphite thus allowing the waste from sawing to be reused.

Shot & Edited using iPhone 6+  

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About The Inspiration Shots

My name is Tommy Too and I'm a newbie in photography and blogging. The intention of creating this blog is to share some of my work and to keep track the improvement of my photography skill. Nevertheless the most important thing is to getting feedback or comment from other professional photographer just like you.

Posted on March 19, 2016, in iPhoneOgraphy 366, Photography and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 16 Comments.

  1. Wonderful post, thanks for sharing! Fantastic photo!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow! 🙂
    I learned a lot. Thank you so much.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Whoa ! Never knew so much about pencils. thanks for posting.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. They are now in use in Space!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Zero gravity caused problems for pens & pencils (pencil shavings and the dust from graphite ) NASA spent a huge amount of money on developing the Space Pen, but the Russians, I believe, still use a pencil – perhaps not a graphite pencil :-o).

    Liked by 1 person

  6. DeRicki Johnson

    A delightful piece of history. Now I don’t have to worry about lead poisoning from all the No. 2 pencils I chewed throughout my school years! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Thanks for the lovely photo and the description that followed. I learnt a lot . Thanks again

    Liked by 1 person

  8. BEST article about pencils I’ve ever read. Actually, I have never read about pencils and didn’t know that led was never used (I knew modern pencils were made of graphite).

    Now I know! Thanks for the interesting info! The photo is pretty awesome too!
    Have a great weekend!

    ❤ carmen

    Liked by 1 person

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