What Are The Thing Can’t be Measure?

iPhoneOgraphy – 14 May 2016 (Day 135/366)

A tape measure or measuring tape is a flexible ruler. It consists of a ribbon of cloth, plastic, fibre glass, or metal strip with linear-measurement markings. It is a common measuring tool. Its design allows for a measure of great length to be easily carried in pocket or toolkit and permits one to measure around curves or corners. Today it is ubiquitous, even appearing in miniature form as a keychain fob, or novelty item. Surveyors use tape measures in lengths of over 100 m (300+ ft).

The first record of a people using a measuring device was by the Romans using marked strips of leather, but this was more like a regular ruler than a tape measure. On July 14, 1868, a patent was filed by one Alvin J. Fellows of New Haven, Connecticut. Fellows’ rule, although crude and flimsy, was the first attempt to make a spring tape measure. On 3 January 1922, Hiram A. Farrand received the patent he filed in 1919 for his spring tape measure. Sometime between 1922 and December 1926, Farrand experimented with the help of The Brown Company in Berlin, New Hampshire. It is there Hiram and William Wentworth Brown began mass-producing the tape measure. Their product was later sold to Stanley Works.

Shot & Edited using iPhone 6+

Advertisements

About The Inspiration Shots

My name is Tommy Too and I'm a newbie in photography and blogging. The intention of creating this blog is to share some of my work and to keep track the improvement of my photography skill. Nevertheless the most important thing is to getting feedback or comment from other professional photographer just like you.

Posted on May 14, 2016, in iPhoneOgraphy 366, Photography and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. I wanted you to know I have nominated you for a 3-day quote challenge. It will be posted on Saturday…hope you can do it! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: