Daily Archives: June 7, 2016

Soybean Pudding Dessert 

iPhoneOgraphy – 07 Jun 2016 (Day 159/366)

Douhua (Chinese: 豆花; pinyin: dòuhuā) is the short form of doufuhua (Chinese: 豆腐花; pinyin: dòufuhuā) or daufufaa (Jyut Chinese: 豆腐花; jyutping: dau fu faa). It is a Chinese snack made with very soft tofu. It is also referred to as tofu pudding and soybean pudding.

Tofu or doufu (Chinese: 豆腐, dòufu) or daufufaa (Jyut chinese:豆腐, dau fu) is thought to have originated in ancient China during the Western Han Dynasty. Chinese people have developed and enriched the recipes for tofu dishes on the basis of their own tastes, such as mapo tofu, stinky tofu, pickled tofu and uncongealed tofu pudding, etc.

In northern China, douhua is often eaten with soy sauce, thus resulting in a savory flavor. Northern Chinese often refer to douhua as doufunao (Simplified Chinese: 豆腐脑; Pinyin: dòufunǎo). literally ‘tofu brains’ (often shortened to “豆脑 dòunǎo”). Local Beijing people usually eat doufunao for breakfast together with eggs or youtiao (fried dough sticks). Doufunao can be found at breakfast stands along the streets in the morning. Other times it is hard to find outside of a restaurant.

Douhua in Sichuan is often made without any sugar at all, then served by carrying pole or bicycle vendors with a number of condiments such as chili oil, soy sauce, Sichuan pepper, scallions, and nuts, and is sometimes eaten along with white rice as well.

In Singapore and Malaysia, it is more commonly known by its names tau hua or tau huay in Min Nan, or by the Cantonese name (tau fu fa) with the Cantonese variation being more common in Malaysia. In Penang, the common term is tau huadue to the Hokkien roots of the local Chinese dialect.

It is usually served either with a clear sweet syrup alone, with ginkgo seeds suspended in the syrup, or in a sugar syrup infused with pandan.

Shot & Edited using iPhone 6+

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