Dashboard Of A Vehicle 

iPhoneOgraphy – 09 Sep 2016 (Day 253/366)

A dashboard (also called dash, instrument panel, or fascia) is a control panel placed in front of the driver of an automobile, housing instrumentation and controls for operation of the vehicle.

Originally, the word ‘dashboard’ applied to a barrier of wood or leather fixed at the front of a horse-drawn carriage or sleigh to protect the driver from mud or other debris “dashed up” (thrown up) by the horses’ hooves. Commonly these did not perform any additional function other than providing a convenient handhold for ascending into the driver’s seat, or a small clip with which to secure the reins when not in use.

When the first ‘horseless carriages’ were constructed in the late 19th century, with engines mounted beneath the driver such as the Daimler Stahradwagen, the simple dashboard was retained to protect occupants from debris thrown up by the cars’ front wheels. However, as car design evolved to position the motor in front of the driver, the dashboard became a panel that protected vehicle occupants from the heat and oil of the engine. With gradually increasing mechanical complexity, this panel formed a convenient location for the placement of gauges and minor controls, and from this evolved the modern instrument panel, although retaining its archaic common name.

Items located on the dashboard at first included the steering wheel and simple instrumentation to show speed, fuel level and oil pressure. However, the instrument cluster of a modern car or motorcycle may be far more complex and in addition to basics information provided by the speedometer, tachometer, odometer and fuel gauge, may feature gauges and tell-tales such as turn indicators, gearshift position, seat belt warning light, parking-brake-engagement warning light and an engine-malfunction light. There may also be indicators for low fuel, low oil pressure, low tire pressure and faults in the airbag (SRS) system. Heating and ventilation controls and vents, lighting controls, audio equipment and automotive navigation systems are also mounted on the dashboard.

The top of a dashboard may contain vents for the heating and air conditioning system and speakers for an audio system. A glove compartment is commonly located on the passenger’s side. There may also be an ashtray and a cigarette lighter which can provide a power outlet for other low-voltage appliances.

In 1937, Chrysler, Dodge, DeSoto, and Plymouth cars came with a safety dashboard that was flat, raised above knee height, and had all the controls mounted flush.

Padded dashboards were advocated in the 1930s by car safety pioneer Claire L. Straith. In 1948, the Tucker became the first car with a padded dashboard.

One of the safety enhancements of the 1970s was the widespread adoption of padded dashboards. The padding is commonly polyurethane foam, while the surface is commonly either polyvinyl chloride (PVC) or leather in the case of luxury models.

In the early and mid-1990s, airbags became a standard feature of steering wheels and dashboards.

Shot & Edited using iPhone 6+

Advertisements

About The Inspiration Shots

My name is Tommy Too and I'm a newbie in photography and blogging. The intention of creating this blog is to share some of my work and to keep track the improvement of my photography skill. Nevertheless the most important thing is to getting feedback or comment from other professional photographer just like you.

Posted on September 9, 2016, in iPhoneOgraphy 366, Photography and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Love science and etymology – you do dashed off both nicely.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: