Let Have Some Dim Sum

iPhoneOgraphy – 26 Oct 2016 (Day 300/366)

Dim sum (simplified Chinese: 点心; traditional Chinese: 點心; pinyin: Diǎnxīn; Sidney Lau: dim2sam1) is a style of Chinese cuisine (particularly Cantonese but also other varieties) prepared as small bite-sized portions of food served in small steamer baskets or on small plates. Dim sum (a transliteration of the Cantonese) dishes are famous for the unique way they are served traditionally whereby fully cooked, ready-to-serve dishes are pushed on carts around the restaurant for diners to select without leaving their seats.

Dim sum is usually linked with the older tradition from yum cha (drinking tea), which has its roots in travelers on the ancient Silk Road needing a place to rest. Thus, teahouses were established along the roadside. An imperial physician in the third century wrote that combining tea with food would lead to excessive weight gain. People later discovered that tea can aid in digestion, so teahouse owners began adding various snacks.

The unique culinary art dim sum originated with the Cantonese in southern China, who over the centuries transformed yum cha from a relaxing respite to a loud and happy dining experience. In Hong Kong, and in most cities and towns in Guangdong province, many restaurants start serving dim sum as early as five in the morning. It is a tradition for the elderly to gather to eat dim sum after morning exercises. For many in southern China, yum cha is treated as a weekend family day. More traditional dim sum restaurants typically serve dim sum until mid-afternoon. However, in modern society, it has become commonplace for restaurants to serve dim sum at dinner time; various dim sum items are even sold as take-out for students and office workers on the go.

A traditional dim sum brunch includes various types of steamed buns such as cha siu bao (a steamed bun filled with barbecue pork), dumplings and rice noodle rolls (cheong fun), which contain a range of ingredients, including beef, chicken, pork, prawns, and vegetarian options. Many dim sum restaurants also offer plates of steamed green vegetables, roasted meats, congee and other soups. Dessert dim sum is also available and many places offer the customary egg tart. Dim sum is usually eaten as breakfast.

Dim sum can be cooked by steaming and frying, among other methods. The serving sizes are usually small and normally served as three or four pieces in one dish. It is customary to order family style, sharing dishes among all members of the dining party. Because of the small portions, people can try a wide variety of food.

Shot & Edited using iPhone 6+

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About The Inspiration Shots

My name is Tommy Too and I'm a newbie in photography and blogging. The intention of creating this blog is to share some of my work and to keep track the improvement of my photography skill. Nevertheless the most important thing is to getting feedback or comment from other professional photographer just like you.

Posted on October 26, 2016, in iPhoneOgraphy 366, Photography and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 9 Comments.

  1. A very interesting post on Cantonese cuisine!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Are those the soupy dumplings in your photo? They’re my favorite… *mouth watering*

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I like Dim Sum. When I first came to US, I didn’t have dim sum the first year. Then a friend took me to China Town in Seattle to have dim sum. I ate like I was starved to death. Thank you for liking my Yellowstone photo. I’m following you to see your photos. I like to travel and take photos, but I have other posts also. It would be a pleasure to have your follow.

    https://theshowersofblessing.wordpress.com/about-me/

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Nice work!! I’ve got a article and the video on Yum Cha too… you are more than welcomed to check it out and comment! Thanks https://tivamoo.com/2017/05/14/what-do-we-eat-in-yum-cha/

    Liked by 1 person

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